Answering Your Auto Auction Questions

Buying a car is always a big responsibility. But making that choice on where to buy your car is a huge decision that needs to be thought through carefully. There are many choices on where you can buy your next automobile. You may buy it from a car lot or even off of eBay but have you considered local auto auctions as a place to get your next used car?

Auto auctions are becoming quite popular. But there are some things you absolutely should consider before making such an important purchase from an auction. Are you getting the best deal for your money? What happens if something goes wrong? These are questions that you have to think about when it comes to your new purchase. In this article we will cover what auto auctions are and how they can either help or hinder your pursuit of a new automobile.

What are auto auctions?

Auto auctions are places where cars are sold. It could be from a public auction that has several vehicles to sell or it could be from an online auction at such places as eBay. There are also government seized auctions that occur regularly.

The best place to look for these auctions is in your local newspaper. Many companies regularly have auctions at a set place and can offer up more choices in cars, trucks, vans and sport-utility vehicles.

What forms of payment are accepted at auto auctions?

Each auction company has different rules about forms of payment. Some will accept a local check while others out of the area may not. Cash is always a good idea to have when you go to one of these auto auctions.

If you buy your car from an online auto auction you may be able to pay with PayPal and then bring the rest in cash or a certified check when you go to pick up the vehicle. If you are unsure of what form of money to bring you can always call the auction company to see what forms of payment they accept.

Where do auto auctions get their cars?

Auto auctions get their cars from a variety of sources. The cars may be from repossessions foreclosed by the lender or the bank. Some cars come from private owners who want to sell their car in an auction environment rather than through the newspaper. eBay has turned into a popular auto auction site with many dealerships selling their inventory through the website.

Is the seller obliged to state any defects on the car?

There is a huge difference between what a seller should do and what they actually do. This is where ethics comes into play. If the seller knows that the engine is knocking or that the car has been wrecked they should disclose this knowledge to the public before bidding commences.

Many states require that if a seller knows about a particular problem and does not disclose it, they can be held liable if the car breaks down after purchase. Basically it is the seller committing fraud against the buyer and fraud in all states is illegal.

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